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Finding a Good Troop Leadership Position

To earn the star, life, and eagle ranks, you need to keep a leadership position for several months. There are lots of troop leadership positions to choose from. You can be a patrol leader, senior patrol leader, quartermaster, scribe, and many other things. 



Senior Patrol Leader

The Senior Patrol Leader is the highest youth leadership position in a troop. They shoulder the responsibility for leading meetings of the troop and the patrol leaders council and provide valuable leadership in planning and carrying out the troop’s program of outdoor activities, service projects, and events. Responsibilities of the senior patrol leader are to run all troop meetings, events, activities, and the annual program planning conference. Run the patrol leaders council (PLC) meetings. Appoint other troop junior leaders with the advice and counsel of the Scoutmaster. Assign duties and responsibilities to junior leaders. Assist the Scoutmaster with junior leader training. Set a good example. Wear the Scout uniform correctly. Live by the Scout Oath and Law, and Show Scout spirit.

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

The assistant senior patrol leader is the second-highest youth leadership position in the troop, working closely with the senior patrol leader to help the troop move forward. The assistant senior patrol leader acts as the senior patrol leader in the absence of the senior patrol leader or when called upon and provides leadership to other youth leaders in the troop. The assistant senior patrol leader is appointed by the senior patrol leader under the guidance of the Scoutmaster. Responsibilities include helping the senior patrol leader lead meetings and activities. Run the troop in the absence of the senior patrol leader. Help train and supervise the troop scribe, quartermaster, instructor, librarian, historian, webmaster, chaplain aide, and OA representative. Serve as a member of the patrol leaders council. Set a good example. Wear the Scout uniform correctly. Live by the Scout Oath and Law. Show Scout spirit. Lend a hand controlling the patrols and building patrol spirit.

Patrol Leader

The patrol leader is the patrol’s key leader, representing the patrol at all patrol leaders’ council meetings and the annual program planning conference, and keeping patrol members informed of decisions made. Patrol leaders carry out planning, leading, and evaluating patrol meetings and activities, and assure patrols are prepared to participate in all troop activities. They keep their patrol intact so they can work together and share responsibilities to get things done. It is incumbent upon them to be a good example for the members of their patrol and the rest of the troop. Responsibilities include planning and leading patrol meetings and activities. Keeping patrol members informed. Assigning each patrol member a specific duty. Representing his patrol at all patrol leaders’ council meetings and the annual program planning conference. Preparing the patrol to participate in all troop activities. Working with other troop leaders to make the troop run well. Knowing the abilities of each patrol member. Setting a good example. Wearing the Scout uniform correctly. Living by the Scout Oath and Law. Showing and developing patrol spirit.

Quartermaster

Troop guides serve as both a leader and a mentor to the members of the new-Scout patrol. They should be an older Scout who holds at least the First Class rank and can work well with younger Scouts. The troop guide helps the patrol leader of the new-Scout patrol lead their patrol, so they can develop into a well-functioning group, working together harmoniously and productively. Responsibilities include introducing new Scouts to troop operations. Guiding new Scouts from harassment by older Scouts. Helping new Scouts towards earning the First Class rank. Teaching basic Scout skills. Coaching the patrol leader of the new-Scout patrol on his duties. Working with the patrol leader at patrol leaders’ council meetings. Attending patrol leaders’ council meetings with the patrol leader of the new-Scout patrol. Counseling individuals Scouts on Scouting challenges. Setting a good example. Wearing the Scout uniform correctly. Living by the Scout Oath and Law. Showing Scout spirit. Responsibilities include keeping records on patrol and troop equipment. Making sure equipment is in good working condition. Issuing equipment and making sure it is returned in good condition. Making suggestions for new or replacement items. Working with the troop committee member responsible for the equipment. Setting a good example. Wearing the Scout uniform correctly. Living by the Scout Oath and Law. Showing Scout spirit.

Historian

The historian collects, assembles, and preserves troop photographs, news stories, trophies, flags, scrapbooks, awards, and other memorabilia, and makes materials available for Scouting activities, courts of honor, the media, and troop history projects. Responsibilities include gathering photos and facts about troop activities and keeping them in a historical file or scrapbook. Taking care of troop trophies, ribbons, and souvenirs of troop activities. Setting a good example. Wearing the Scout uniform correctly. Living by the Scout Oath and Law. Showing Scout spirit.

Conclusion

Troop leadership positions are a necessary part of a Scouts B.S.A. troop. They help the troop run properly, and they are required for several ranks. I have given a summary of several good troop leadership positions. You can find several more on the Troop 30 Website. If you like this, share it on social media and leave a comment with your thoughts. Subscribe to Scouting Overload to get weekly emails with all of our new content.

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